saturday night at a4cade.

Two Boston-area restaurants recently joined forces to create a new experience in Cambridge’s Central Square. A4cade was born out of a collaboration between the pizza mavens of Area Four and the sandwich connoisseurs at Roxy’s Grilled Cheese. The new venue is a 21+ arcade/restaurant/bar that I had the pleasure of visiting over the weekend. A4cade opens at 5pm and gets a line outside pretty much right away (at least on a Saturday). You have to walk through the regular Roxy’s restaurant to get to the arcade and there’s no sign outside letting you know it’s there – which is a little confusing but also gives it kind of a cool speakeasy feeling.

Once inside, there are two full bars and a bunch of servers for ordering food and drinks. And of course, there are a lot of games. I didn’t grow up in a video game household and I’m not great at the more screen-based classics like Pac-Man and NBA Jam. I am a big fan though of the more active games like skee ball, foosball, and hoop fever.

We spent a couple hours and had a great time and some really delicious food and drinks. Of course I took a few photos – check them out below!

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bits of inspiration – #90.

Another project from the architects at Gensler, this time in Boston’s Fort Point area. General Electric Co. announced about a year ago that they would be relocating their headquarters from Fairfield, Connecticut to the Boston area. Gensler’s building designs were published this week, revealing that G.E’s new campus would be located at the former site of the Necco candy manufacturing facilities. The building will face the water, with direct access to Boston’s Harborwalk. Check out some of the renderings below.

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image courtesy of Gensler


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image courtesy of Gensler


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image courtesy of Gensler


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image courtesy of Gensler


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image courtesy of Gensler

bits of inspiration – #86.

One of my favorite things about living in Boston’s Back Bay neighborhood is the proximity to so many beautiful historic brownstones. Marveling at the facades of these buildings is a true pastime of mine so naturally I was very excited when Boston Magazine published an article this week profiling one of the artisans of these homes. Trained as a cabinet and furniture maker, John Carlton transitioned to making and restoring historic doors in 2005. Carlton’s one-man shop, Historic Door Corporation, has been inundated with requests ever since. I loved reading about his love for his craft and the efforts Carlton takes to insure that every door he creates is historically accurate to the home it adorns. I’ve collected some of my favorite examples from Historic Door’s portfolio below and  I’d encourage everyone to read the full profile from Boston Magazine.

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All photos courtesy of Historic Door Corporation