bits of inspiration – #93.

I’m going to be out of town during Halloween this year so I haven’t invested in any festive decorating (save for a lone pumpkin on my mantle). Halloween has always seemed to me like the holiday where you have to just embrace campiness. I mean there can’t possibly be an elegant way to decorate with bats and skeletons right? Well after seeing styleathome.com’s latest post on decorating for a Haute Hallows Eve I may have to reevaluate my stance. They’ve managed to make a chic Halloween dinner party a thing and I’m starting to really wish I were going to be around to celebrate this year. I especially love the simplicity of painting mini pumpkins to transform them into a more sophisticated table-top accessory. Head over to their site to see all the DIY information you need to create this on your own and check out some of my favorite images from the post below.

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bits of inspiration – #90.

Another project from the architects at Gensler, this time in Boston’s Fort Point area. General Electric Co. announced about a year ago that they would be relocating their headquarters from Fairfield, Connecticut to the Boston area. Gensler’s building designs were published this week, revealing that G.E’s new campus would be located at the former site of the Necco candy manufacturing facilities. The building will face the water, with direct access to Boston’s Harborwalk. Check out some of the renderings below.

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image courtesy of Gensler


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image courtesy of Gensler


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image courtesy of Gensler


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image courtesy of Gensler


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image courtesy of Gensler

bits of inspiration – #88.

While I am an avid HGTV viewer, it was not until recently that I first had the pleasure of watching Island HuntersIf you’re not familiar, it’s basically House Hunters but for people looking to purchase their own private islands. As someone who likes their TV programing to be aspirational, I was instantly addicted. Coincidentally, this week it was announced that a private island in Orleans, Massachusetts has become available to purchase for $12.5M. Sipson Island offers 25 private acres, located in Cape Cod’s Pleasant Bay. It’s location in an area of the Cape where most beachfront land is protected by the National Seashore makes Sipson Island’s listing a particularly rare and valuable opportunity. Check out some of my favorite photos from the listing below.

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Photo courtesy of Robert Paul Properties

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Photo courtesy of Robert Paul Properties

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Photo courtesy of Robert Paul Properties

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Photo courtesy of Robert Paul Properties

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Photo courtesy of Robert Paul Properties

bits of inspiration – #87.

Reading this Huffington Post article yesterday about a home designed by Japanese architect, Issei Suma, I was struck by how the woodland structure seemed so simultaneously modern and whimsical. While these styles seem in some ways at odds with one another, upon reading Suma’s biography on his own site it’s clear that these sort of contradictions are at the very heart of his approach. His “about” page reads like this:

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The home he has designed will serve an altruistic purpose as a cafe and guest house for the elderly, run by a social worker and a cook who serve the surrounding community. The structure, situated in the mountain ridge in Japan’s Shizuoka Prefecture, has an almost magical serene quality to it’s design. The exterior form projects a kind of ethereal woodland aesthetic, while the inside of the home has the feeling of a really modern spa or retreat space. I’ve included some of my favorite images below. Definitely head over to the original article for more details and check out Suma’s professional site to see more from his portfolio.

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photo courtesy of Takumi Ota Photography

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photo courtesy of Takumi Ota Photography

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photo courtesy of Takumi Ota Photography

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photo courtesy of Takumi Ota Photography

bits of inspiration – #86.

One of my favorite things about living in Boston’s Back Bay neighborhood is the proximity to so many beautiful historic brownstones. Marveling at the facades of these buildings is a true pastime of mine so naturally I was very excited when Boston Magazine published an article this week profiling one of the artisans of these homes. Trained as a cabinet and furniture maker, John Carlton transitioned to making and restoring historic doors in 2005. Carlton’s one-man shop, Historic Door Corporation, has been inundated with requests ever since. I loved reading about his love for his craft and the efforts Carlton takes to insure that every door he creates is historically accurate to the home it adorns. I’ve collected some of my favorite examples from Historic Door’s portfolio below and  I’d encourage everyone to read the full profile from Boston Magazine.

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All photos courtesy of Historic Door Corporation